A Taste of Heaven: It's closer than we think. Thoughts from C.S Lewis' The Problem of of Pain

“For union exists only between distincts; and, perhaps, from this point of view, we catch a momentary glimpse of the meaning of all things. . .

Once, before creation, it would have been true to say that everything was God. But God created: He caused things to be other than Himself that, being distinct, they might learn to love Him and achieve union instead of sameness.  . .

But the eternal distinctness of each soul- the secret which makes the union between each soul and God a species in itself-will never abrogate the law that forbids ownership in heaven. As to its fellow-creatures, each soul, we suppose, will be eternally engaged in giving away to all the rest that which it receives. And as to God, we must remember that the soul is but a hollow which God fills. Its union with God is, almost by definition, a continual self-abandonment-an opening, an unveiling, a surrender, of itself. . .

For in self-giving, if anywhere, we touch a rhythm not only of all creation but of all being. . .

From the highest to the lowest, self exists to be abdicated and, by that abdication, becomes the more truly self, to be thereupon yet more abdicated, and so forever.”

 

This week we finish C.S. Lewis’, The Problem of Pain, which we have been reading for the last few months in the Liturgy of Life Reading Group.

Lewis ends his book on pain with a chapter about the hope of heaven.  While life may be a story of suffering it at the very same time is a constant reminder of the eternal joys of heaven.  As our hearts are broken we make space for God to rebuild us, we open up to connection with humanity, we muster all that is unique and special within us and offer it to the world.   A taste of heaven requires no money or strength or resources, no education or skill, just a human soul willing to make a sacrifice.

Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

 

A Taste of Heaven: It's closer than we think. Thoughts from C.S Lewis' The Problem of of Pain

 

A Taste of Heaven: It's closer than we think. Thoughts from C.S Lewis' The Problem of of Pain

A Taste of Heaven: It's closer than we think. Thoughts from C.S Lewis' The Problem of of Pain

A Taste of Heaven: It's closer than we think. Thoughts from C.S Lewis' The Problem of of Pain

 

A Taste of Heaven: It's closer than we think. Thoughts from C.S Lewis' The Problem of of Pain

 

 

 

This post is part of our Reading Group series. Right now we are reading The Problem of Pain by C.S. Lewis. We would love for you to join us.

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