An Update on our Garden
In the Words of
The Cloister Walk

My garden, even more than most, is an exercise in faith.

And in failure.

An update on our container garden and thoughts from the cloister walk. Liturgy of life.

These aren’t my words, but they certainly could be, they come from Kathleen Norris and I read them this week in The Cloister Walk which we are working through as part of the Liturgy of Life Reading Group.

I shared early in the spring my plans for our container garden, and wanted to give you an update.

In typical fashion this year’s garden has produced a very modest yeild.

When we started my daughter said she wanted corn, beets and tomatoes and so that is what we did.

Corn it turns out can be grown in a container, but needs a lot of nutrients. At about 3 inches long these mini ears are really darling. Though we won’t get much yield from them (as in, we won’t get any yeild from them). But it has been a lot of fun to watch these grow especially for my daughter, even though they are only about 3 feet high in their containers they are well above her head which is fantastic to a preschooler.

An update on our container garden and thoughts from the cloister walk. Liturgy of life.

We added a cucumbers which initially did beautifully, but Texas is known for something called white powdery mildew which attacks  cucumbers and squashes. I battled it last year on our pumpkins and this year didn’t have the time to spray it every night. It looks like we will get three lovely cucumbers but the rest are all shriveled up.

An update on our container garden and thoughts from the cloister walk. Liturgy of life.

An update on our container garden and thoughts from the cloister walk. Liturgy of life.

The tomatoes have done better than in some years. We got one tomato so far, it was a bit mealy for over watering and I had to cut out the top quarter where it had gotten eaten by something but we ate the rest and enjoyed it. It looks like we will get a few more and then the Texas heat will probably keep us from getting any fruit until fall. But if I can manage to keep it alive through our move (not likely but not impossible)  once it cools down again we may get a few more, everyone says fall tomatoes are the best in Texas anyway.

An update on our container garden and thoughts from the cloister walk. Liturgy of life.

The strawberries have been the real gem of this garden, they are still flowering and producing some small berries. We have probably had about 8 so far and are due for a few more. Not much but it is always a bit encouraging to rummage around and find a ripe red berry hidden under the leaves.

An update on our container garden and thoughts from the cloister walk. Liturgy of life.

There are a few other things, it looks like one, maybe two of the beets will be large enough to actually eat, we have had one jalapeno and will get one more, the herbs for the most part are doing okay and we are getting some hummingbirds on the flowers which has been nice though all in all it hasn’t been much.

I started with Norris and I think I’ll end with her too.

In the medieval era gardens were designed to suffice for the loss of Eden. The garden I’ve grown into, in my middle age, seems more a kind of Purgatory, but I love it. It’s a ratty little garden, not much at all. But I can call it mine.

We would love to have you read and ponder along with us, let us know your thoughts or join the Liturgy of Life Reading Group, let’s do this together.

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